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Adili Liberman

Living Pathological Museum

The word Hysteria stems from the Greek word “hystera”, meaning ‘uterus’. It was once believed that the uterus migrates within the body, causing chest pains and difficulty breathing, the cure being intercourse and ultimately pregnancy. At the end of the 19th century, French psychiatrist Jean-Martin Charcot – believing that the hysterical mechanism holds the power to stir complex neurological phenomena – diagnosed, researched and catalogued his patients in a way that reaffirmed hysteria as an explicitly female pathology.

He created ‘female hysterical attacks’ spectacles, which were among the most popular public events in Paris.

We will reconstruct such a spectacle in order to expose the subject-object relationship on stage in a purified fashion that moves between the worlds of performance, science, medicine and gender.

  • By | Adili Liberman
  • Performers | Adili Liberman, Karmit Burian, Ma’ayan Choresh, Meshi Olinky
  • Lighting | Iris Mualem
  • Music | Dganit Elyakim
  • Visual | Eyal Tagar

Adili Liberman recreates the lecture/performance of Jean-Martin Charcot’s ‘Living Pathological Museum’ (Charcot’s term) in Mofa’ei HaHysteria (the Hysteria Shows) – in a harrowingly chilling performance that is terribly entertaining. Meshi  Olinky , Karmit Burian, and Maayan Horesh in their demure Victorian gowns portray the stages of affliction, cued into action by pressure on the salient points of the body. Revealing the eloquence of the body as its speaks its suffering and desire, writhing, contorting, and ultimately reveling in its own power, finding an alternative path beyond the boundaries of an oppressive restrictive society.

One might well view Liberman’s work as a challenge to examine the accepted tropes and forms of discourse in our own time.

Ayelet Dekel, Midnight Esat (July 2016)

The hysterical phases are demonstrated to the public in most impressive physicality, whilst exposing the expropriation of the female body from the woman herself in the name of science.

Idit Suslik, Achbar Ha’ir (July 2016)

  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar

Adili Liberman

Born in 1979, Adili is a Tel Aviv based theatre maker, actress and teacher, recently graduated with honors her MFA from the Tel Aviv University

Amongst the productions she has performed with, are ‘Ticket to the Circus’, ‘How is the Beast?’ (production of the Israel Festival) and ‘The Lost Paradise – On the Footsteps of Prometheus Bound’ (Winner of the Best Production Award at the Acre Theatre Festival) and more.

She is a founding member of the ‘Public Movement’ performance group and has performed with them since 2007 in numerous projects around the world.

Together with actor Nadav Bossem, Adily created the ‘Girls in Arms’ duo, presenting satirical site responsive fictive heritage tours.

  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar
  • Photo: Eyal Tagar
    Photo: Eyal Tagar

A fascinating artistic challenge was brought by Adili Liberman in her new creation “Living pathological museum”, complex and demanding- this piece does not go easily down the throat.

Meshi Olinki, Karmit Burian and Ma’ayan Horesh are fascinating and at times breathtaking in demonstrating the physical and emotional sequences, and each, including Liberman herself, fiercely exposes her pathological state.

Tzvi Goren, habama (July 2016)