as is arts as is arts

Open menu Close menu
BACK

Daphna Silberg

Documentary Theatre

Lives and works in Tel-Aviv, Daphna Graduated with honors from the MFA program in theatre directing (the Department of Theatre Arts) and BFA program in screenwriting (Film and Television Department) both in Tel Aviv University. Member of the 2014 Lincoln Center Theatre directors Lab.

Daphna’s recent projects include writing and directing Ticket to the Circus (Tmuna theatre, 2015); Directing The Golden Dragon by Roland Schimmelpfening (Acco fringe theatre festival, 2014); Writing and directing Spermology (Tmuna theatre, 2014); Directing The Maids by Jean Genet (Beit-Zvi – School of The Performing Arts, 2014);

Touring: Demonstrate, Ticket to the Circus; Spermology

More theatrical projects that Daphna was involved in in recent years are – Directing Scenes from an Execution by Howard Barker (Goodman acting school of the Negev, 2013); Translating and directing Tales from Vienna Woods by Odon Von Horvath (graduate work at Tel Aviv University, 2013); Translating and directing Whose Life Is It Anyway? (hosted in Habima National Theatre, 2012-13); Writing and directing Mother Needed (Bat Yam International Street-Theatre Festival, 2010); Writing and directing In the Theater, based on a short story by Asaf Tzipor  (Short Theatre Festival, Tzavta Theatre, 2010); Writing and directing Every Artist Has A Mother (SmallBama festival, TAU 2009).

Demonstrate

 

Demonstrate is a Documentary theatre performance based entirely on a protocol of a rape trial court discussion. Throughout the discussion, held in 2008 at the county courthouse in Jerusalem, the defense attorney speaks to the 16 years old rape victim in a humiliating and condescending manner. He undermines her intelligence, blames the sexual assault help centers for “putting words in her mouth”, and tries to find out if she was “wet” during the rape. In the process the victim is also asked by the court to demonstrate on the courtroom floor the positions she was raped in by the four young man.

Demonstrate reconstructs the trial in a very clean and sterile design using bits from the recordings of the original trial in the sound track and changing the gender of the actors – a young man acts the rape victim while all the judges and lawyers are played by female actresses.

  • Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Ronen Goldman
    Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Ronen Goldman
  • Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
    Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
  • Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
    Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
  • Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
    Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
  • Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
    Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
  • Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
    Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
  • Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson
    Demonstrate (2017), Photo: Maya Louson

A short interview  with Daphna about  Demonstrate

Ticket to the Circus

The show is a discussion in the internal affairs committee at the Israeli parliament. The text  is taken directly from the protocol of a meeting dealing with Israel’s actions regarding the refugees from Africa. Seven actors portray the leading committee members, and welcome the audience members by giving them name-tags and texts and turning them into participants who protest, interrupt and play an active role in the decision-making process and the construction of the debate.

It is a show about a discussion with no discussion, a democracy with no freedom of speech, in which your sentence is made even before you opened your mouth to speak.

“Even though the actors accurately portray the characters and even resemble them physically, Silberg stresses that the quality of the impersonation is not the main point… This discussion provides a painful example to the way the discourse is conducted in the Israeli parliament.”

Yair Ashkenazi, Haaretz (March 2015)

  • Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Ronen Goldman
    Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Ronen Goldman
  • Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Assaf Sagi
    Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Assaf Sagi
  • Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Omer Alshich
    Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Omer Alshich
  • Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Gadi Dagon
    Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Gadi Dagon
  • Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Avi Golran
    Ticket to the Circus (2015), photo: Avi Golran

Credits

  • Written and directed by Daphna Silberg
  • Stage design | Annie Atedgy
  • Light design | Adi Shimrony
  • Movement advisor | Mor Leedor
  •  Artistic advisor | Yair Vardi
  • Actors | Hamies ElsheikhRami Kashy, Maayan turgeman, Nadav Laor, Michal Weinberg, Adili Liberman, Natalie Fainstein

Spermology

  • Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
    Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
  • Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
    Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
  • Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
    Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
  • Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
    Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
  • Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
    Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
  • Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon
    Spermology (2014), photo: Gadi Dagon

“Our special team of donors is made of the most eclectic collection of quality men. Exceptional students, medical interns, graduates of top combat units, art lovers, and in general, people with great personalities.”

(from the Sperm Bank catalog)

Credits

  • Written and directed by Daphna Silberg
  • Translation | Natalie Feinstein
  • Performers | Efrat ArnonAlit KreizNataly Zukerman
  • Costume design | Rona plotek
  • Light design | Matan Preminger
  • Music | Moran Meisels
  • Artistic director | Yair Vardi
  • Premiered at Tmuna Theatre, 2014

 “An intelligently conceived and exquisitely performed interactive theatre piece that takes a long hard look at the ethical aspect of sperm banks”

Ayelet Dekel, MidnightEast (March 2014)

Three women take the audience on a lively commercial tour through Israeli sperm bank catalogs. They fantasize about the ideal Israeli man – a tall (at least 1.78m) combat soldier in an elite unit, blond and free of either mental or physical diseases. They sort the audience members according to the bank’s strict criteria and choose the perfect donor.

The text of the show is taken directly from the bank’s catalog, which exposes society’s values and the principles on which it constructs its identity and visualize its future.

 

“In a hilarious way, Daphna Silberg and her actresses manage to present a very serious and upsetting issue”

Valentina Marcenaro, Schueterman (February 2015)